The Blue Diary

arctic surfers
15 May 2018
Natural Wonders

New activities in Iceland in 2018

When we wanted to see what’s new and interesting for travelers in Iceland in 2018, we looked to see what the good people at Startup Tourism in Iceland are up to. Some of the activities are very interesting!

turf houses in Iceland
9 April 2018
Icelandic Culture
Practical info

3 common misconceptions about Iceland

You’ve all heard rumours, seen memes or an exaggerated version of Iceland and Icelanders in TV shows or movies. We’re here to tell you that not all of it’s real!

Icelandic horse
9 April 2018
Practical info

When is spring in Iceland? Icelandic seasons explained

When is spring in Iceland? Sometimes it feels like: Never. But that’s not true. It’s in late March until the middle of June.

Mount Kirkjufell
9 April 2018
Natural Wonders

The best ways to enjoy the midnight sun

If you’re lucky enough to be in Iceland when the midnight sun appears, you’re in for a treat, if you bought a sleep mask!

Brennivín bottles
9 April 2018
Icelandic Culture

What is Brennivin schnapps? AKA “Black Death”

Black Death was a nasty plague and luckily, our Brennivín booze has nothing to do with the pandemic.

flying ravens
7 March 2018
Icelandic Culture

The raven – Iceland’s smartest bird

Ravens have been a part of Iceland since the settlement. According to legend, the first person to settle in Iceland was Hrafna-Flóki or Raven-Flóki.

troll drawing
7 March 2018
Icelandic Culture

Famous Icelandic Trolls

When traveling around Iceland, you will see many, many, many weird formations in the mountains and lava fields that are said to be petrified trolls.

Akureyri
7 March 2018
Natural Wonders

How does Akureyri compare to Reykjavík?

The two biggest differences between Akureyri and Reykjavík is the location and size. But, how do they compare?

sheep
6 March 2018
Icelandic Culture

How Did the Icelandic Settlers Survive the Harsh Elements?

Well, that is the question. When we, modern Icelanders, go outside in a snowstorm, all dressed up in our winter clothes and are still cold; we cannot fathom how our forefathers and mothers survived.